Browse Items (26 total)

The Postgraduate Zooarchaeology Forum conference will be hosted by the Division of Archaeological Geographical and Environmental Sciences, University of Bradford on Saturday 19th February 2011.

The Postgraduate Zooarchaeology Forum conference is…

The recording of tooth wear is essential to the exploration of age in faunal assemblages. However, most tooth wear systems currently only apply to mandibular teeth, meaning that information from maxillary teeth and jaws is being neglected. For pig,…

Prehistoric exploitation of fauna frequently focuses on large mammals, but smaller species also provided a viable human dietary resource. Aside from the inherent recovery problems associated with small bones, a major issue is unequivocally…

Osteochondrosis often referred to as Osteochrondritis or Baker & Brothwell Type 1 lesions, occurs on the articular surfaces of elements, and are visible as longitudinal or triangular shaped disturbances of the articular surface, often described as…

A depositional history for Brimble Pit Swallet is extrapolated through the thorough investigation in taphonomic differences in the assemblage. The assemblage is small, yet diverse, and was generated from an excavation in the early 1990’s for…

Excavations of the Urartian sites on the territory of Armenia were started in the early fifties and revealing great cultural heritage left behind by the inhabitants of these sites. While most of the material finds were well analyzed and results were…

A diverse range of burial rites were employed for both humans and animals during later Prehistory in the Outer Hebrides. The Atlantic island practice of burying people below floors in the late Bronze/Iron Age has attracted considerable interest, not…

Britain has the largest Red Deer (Cervus Elaphus) population in Western Europe, largely concentrated in Scotland, and so it is unsurprising that the genetic make up of this population has been extensively studied both for archaeological and stock…

The polecat (Mustela putorius) is widely considered to be native to Britain, while the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) is thought to be a medieval arrival: the ‘received wisdom’ is that ferrets were introduced by the Normans. However, in a 2002…

This poster presents the results from an osteoarchaeological analysis of the avian remains from the Bronze Age to Early Iron Age site of Cladh Hallan. The Scottish Islands contain many archaeological sites, some of which are of worldwide…