Species identification of archaeological bone by collagen fingerprinting

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All Titles

  • Species identification of archaeological bone by collagen fingerprinting

Dublin Core

Title

Species identification of archaeological bone by collagen fingerprinting

Subject

S5-3, Archaeozoology and palaeogenetics: potentials and limits, poster

Description

Abstract:

Collagen has long been known as the most dominant protein in bone and shown to survive burial over long periods of time. Recent advances in the sensitivity and resolution of soft-ionization mass spectrometry have allowed for the analysis of large proteins, such as collagen, and as a result, it is increasingly being used for the analysis of partially degraded-ancient proteins. Although collagen has been thoroughly analysed in archaeological samples for a number of purposes, its genetic information is not commonly exploited. We focus on the analysis of particular peptides of the collagen (I) alpha 2 chain, analysed by MALDI-TOF MS/MS, to infer species information amongst a large set of archaeological specimens, dating back to the Lower Palaeolithic and ranging across a wide geographical area worldwide. The results indicate the potential for extracting collagen peptide markers to identify taxa to the level of genus in most large mammals, and to species level in small mammals. We also confirm the survival of small remnants of the protein, at least as far back in time as the Lower Palaeolithic, and show its potential to persist in much older samples.

Authors:

BUCKLEY Mike, KANSA Sarah, THOMAS-OATES Jane and COLLINS Matthew

Affiliations

University of York, Department of Biology, Heslington, S Block, PO Box 373, YO10 5YW York., England, mbuckley82@gmail.com

Creator

Buckley, Mike
Kansa, Sarah
Thomas-Oates, Jane
Collins, Matthew

Date

August 2010

Contribution Form

Online Submission

No

Document Item Type Metadata

Citation

Buckley, Mike, Kansa, Sarah, Thomas-Oates, Jane and Collins, Matthew. "Species identification of archaeological bone by collagen fingerprinting ," in BoneCommons, Item #1009, http://alexandriaarchive.org/bonecommons/items/show/1009 (accessed July 16, 2019).

License

Creative Commons License