New data from Castel di Guido, a Middle Pleistocene open site in Central Italy

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  • New data from Castel di Guido, a Middle Pleistocene open site in Central Italy

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Title


New data from Castel di Guido, a Middle Pleistocene open site in Central Italy

Subject

S7-1. New perspectives on taphonomy, oral

Description

Abstract:

Between 1980 and 1991, field investigations at Castel di Guido (20 km WNW of Rome, Italy) revealed a depressed area with an extension of about 1100 m2. Archaeological material includes bones and industry ascribed to a local facies of the Acheulean, composed of stone tools made from various rock types and bone artefacts. The large majority of the remains lie on the bottom of an erosional feature, probably evolved into a low energy freshwater basin after the deposition of the assemblage. According to the previous paleontological analysis, the fauna includes a limited number of species, dominated by herbivores (Bos primigenius, Equus ferus, Cervus elaphus and Elephas (Palaeoloxodon) antiquus), whereas carnivores are rare. As in other similar contexts, ambiguities about the interpretation of the site in terms of natural processes versus human behavior exist, therefore a taphonomic approach to the study of the bone sample was necessary, as well as an integration with geoarchaeological data. Preliminary results of these studies are presented. We observed some evidence of carcass exploitation by humans for food and, in the case of elephant, for raw material, but we noticed that natural factors also played an important role in the accumulation and modification of faunal assemblage of Castel di Guido.

Authors:

SACCÀ Daniela

Affiliations

Dipartimento di Scienze Archeologiche, Università di Pisa. 53, Via S. Maria, I-56100 Pisa, Italy, daniela.sacca@gmail.com

Creator

Saccà, Daniela

Date

August 2010

Contribution Form

Document Item Type Metadata

Citation

Saccà, Daniela. " New data from Castel di Guido, a Middle Pleistocene open site in Central Italy ," in BoneCommons, Item #1510, http://alexandriaarchive.org/bonecommons/items/show/1510 (accessed August 9, 2020).