Paleoparasitology and Paleogeography - ancient parasite infections in the Old World and its influence in the colonial America

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  • Paleoparasitology and Paleogeography - ancient parasite infections in the Old World and its influence in the colonial America

Dublin Core

Title

Paleoparasitology and Paleogeography - ancient parasite infections in the Old World and its influence in the colonial America

Subject

S1-6, Palaeoparasitology: advances and potential, oral

Description

Abstract:

Paleoparasitology results opened possibilities to understand disease transmission in ancient populations. Parasite findings in Old and New World archaeological samples contributed with empirical data to understand the presence of parasite infections and paleothologies in ancient material. Combining with archaeological and anthropological data, among other research fields, it is possible to get consistent results about health, disease, and the way ancient people lived and interacted with environment, and how and to where these infections dispersed. Some parasite species infecting humans today date from African ancestors, shared with great apes. Other parasites were acquired over the human process of biologial and cultural evolution. We present examples of parasite findings in archaeological material both from the Old and New World, and how they are closely linked to the different ways ancient populations explored environment and became infected. Main results point to that the most common helminth parasites were already infecting New World ancient inhabitants before European conquest. However, a paleoepidemiological transition occurred at the time of the conquest. Native Americans were induced to live agglomerated, thus facilitating parasite transmition as examplified by paleoparasitology both in North and South American historical archaeological sites. Therefore, the burden of disease must have changed in short time, leading to clinical problems rarely experimented before.

Authors:

ARAÚJO Adauto1, SIANTO Luciana1, BOUCHET Françoise2, LE BAILLY Matthieu3, IÑIGUEZ Alena1, LELES Daniela1, FUGASSA Martín4, REINHARD Karl5, MENDONÇA de Souza Sheila1 and FERREIRA Luiz Fernando1

Affiliations

1 Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Avenida Brasil 4365, Manguinhos, CEP 21040-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. adauto@ensp.fiocruz.br, lsianto@ensp.fiocruz.br, alena@ioc.fiocruz.br, dleles@yahoo.com.br, sferraz@ensp.fiocruz.br, ludovico@ensp.fiocruz.br
2 Université de Reims, 51, rue Cognacq-Jay, 51096 Reims Cedex, France. francoise.bouchet@univ-reims.fr
3 Faculté des Sciences et Techniques del’Université de Franche-Comté, France
4 Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Diag. Alberdi Juan Bautista 2695, 7600 Mar Del Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. mfugassa@mdp.edu.ar
5 University of Nebraska-Lincoln | 101 Hardin Hall, 3100 Holdrege Street, Lincoln, NE 68583-0961, USA. kreinhard1@mac.com

Creator

Araújo, Adauto
Sianto, Luciana
Bouchet, Françoise
Le Bailly, Matthieu
Iñiguez, Alena
Leles, Daniela
Fugassa, Martín
Reinhard, Karl
Mendonça, de Souza Sheila
Ferreira, Luiz Fernando

Date

August 2010

Contribution Form

Online Submission

No

Document Item Type Metadata

Citation

Araújo, Adauto, Sianto, Luciana, Bouchet, Françoise, Le Bailly, Matthieu, Iñiguez, Alena, Leles, Daniela, Fugassa, Martín, Reinhard, Karl, Mendonça, de Souza Sheila and Ferreira, Luiz Fernando. "Paleoparasitology and Paleogeography - ancient parasite infections in the Old World and its influence in the colonial America ," in BoneCommons, Item #936, http://alexandriaarchive.org/bonecommons/items/show/936 (accessed December 6, 2019).

License

Creative Commons License

File: S1-6_27-08_ARAUJO.pdf