Holocene avian remains, human behaviour and seasonality on the South African coast

All Titles

  • Holocene avian remains, human behaviour and seasonality on the South African coast

Dublin Core

Title

Holocene avian remains, human behaviour and seasonality on the South African coast

Subject

S1-1, Archaeozoology of Holocene Africa, oral

Description

Abstract:

Bird bones, particularly of seabirds are common in South African coastal archaeological samples. Results from three important Later Stone Age sites, Eland’s Bay Cave, Die Kelders Cave 1 and Nelson Bay Cave, from different coastal zones are discussed. A range of Southern Ocean and local offshore-island species were utilized as food and raw material. Bird tools, ornaments and symbolic objects on which designs similar to the entoptics of rock art were engraved are described.

Comparison with long-term monthly surveys for beached birds demonstrates that most birds, which included Laridae, Sulidae, Phalacrocoracidae, Spheniscidae, Diomedeidae and Procellariidae, were acquired as beached carcasses, requiring no technological ability, and that this took place seasonally during peaks of colonial breeding, high winds and after storms. Fresh water and terrestrial species were taken. Ground-dwelling Phasianidae and non-food species that breed on ledges in and above caves account for most terrestrial forms. Ostrich eggs were used as containers and for raw material for bead making.

Authors:

AVERY Graham1,2

Affiliations

1 Iziko South African Museum, PO Box 61 Cape Town 8000, South Africa. gavery@iziko.org.za
2 Archaeology Department, University of Cape Town, Private Bag Rondebosch 7700, South Africa

Creator

Avery, Graham

Date

August 2010

Contribution Form

Online Submission

No

Document Item Type Metadata

Citation

Avery, Graham. "Holocene avian remains, human behaviour and seasonality on the South African coast ," in BoneCommons, Item #945, http://alexandriaarchive.org/bonecommons/items/show/945 (accessed December 6, 2019).

License

Creative Commons License

File: S1-1_24-08_AVERY.ppt