Processing techniques for bone grease rendering in Mousterian context

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  • Processing techniques for bone grease rendering in Mousterian context

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Title


Processing techniques for bone grease rendering in Mousterian context

Subject

S5-4, Variability in Human Hunting Behavior During Oxygen Isotope Stages (OIS) 4/3: Implications for Understanding Modern Human Origins, oral

Description

Abstract:

Fat is essential for hunter-gatherers who have a diet relying heavily on meat. In particular, fat is highly valued in temperate and subarctic environments during seasons when ungulates are fat-depleted. Marrow extraction techniques from medullae of limb bones were used early on by the Plio-Pleistocene Hominids. However,, techniques to mobilize the fat contained in cancellous bones may have emerged in the Upper Paleolithic. The presence of fire-cracked rock associated with pitted stone anvils and highly fragmented spongy bones indicate, without question, bone grease rendering by boiling. Nevertheless, in most Paleolithic sites where this extraction technique has been proposed, fire-cracked rock and stone anvils are seldom mentioned. An assessment of French Paleolithic sites with bone grease rendering will be carried out. After the establishment of the characteristics on these sites, the bone assemblages of Les Pradelles and of la Grotte du Noisetier will be studied. Finally, we will discuss the processing techniques for bone grease rendering that may have been used by the Neandertals.

Authors:

COSTAMAGNO Sandrine

Affiliations

TRACES – UMR 5808, CNRS, Maison de la Recherche, Université Toulouse 2 – Le Mirail, 5 allées A. Machado, 31058 Toulouse cedex 9, France, costamag@univ-tlse2.fr

Creator

Costamagno, Sandrine

Date

August 2010

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Document Item Type Metadata

Citation

Costamagno, Sandrine. " Processing techniques for bone grease rendering in Mousterian context ," in BoneCommons, Item #1058, https://alexandriaarchive.org/bonecommons/items/show/1058 (accessed July 23, 2017).